Google Commands for SEO

SEO? Oh, I’ve Heard Of That Before !!: Google Commands for SEO? Are you familiar with these...:

 All SEO Google Commands   ...

Google Commands for SEO

      

  • cache:www.themarketingweekly.com
  • related:www.themarketingweekly.com
  • info:www.themarketingweekly.com
  • allintitle:www.themarketingweekly.com
  • intitle:www.themarketingweekly.com
  • allinurl:www.themarketingweekly.com
  • inurl:www.themarketingweekly.com
Here I have taken www.themarketingweekly.com as an example. Whenever you are using these commands, just simple replace www.themarketingweekly.com with your website URL

Lets look at these commands and few more, a little more in detail, and see what are they all about.
  • Allintitle: This command tells you how many pages online have a particular set of words in their titles. This can be useful for seeing how other site titles are configured. Since the title of a webpage is the primary way of defining page content, you can find relevant topics more easily with allintitle. A great way to combine two functions, and sniff out keyword blurring, is to use this in conjunction with the site: command so you would type in
    allintitle:web development site:example.com” so you can see how many pages on the site have titles about the same topic. Excessive title repetition can drag down search engine rankings, so this is one way to get a quick list of the pages you should modify.
  • Allintext: Want to find pages which mention a topic in their body text? This command ignores other considerations like anchors and titles and goes to the on-page content. Once again, too many similar pages can water down the focus on an important page. When in doubt, focus your energies on the page that gets the best allinanchor score, or has the most topical links pointing at it.
  • Allinurl: This command searches out URLs (or domain names) which contain a certain word or phrase. Search engines give some preference to domain names that contain keyword matches. You could use this command to find sites that you may want to buy. You can also see if other sites are adding descriptive phrases to their own URL structures, so you might see example.com/seo_services/five.html. Once again, this is a good way to check your own site structure for duplicates, especially if you have a site with thousands of pages.
  • Cache: If you don’t know whether or not your site is cached, and you don’t have the Google toolbar, you can simply type in cache: followed by your website. You can even do this for specific pages. The advantage of this command is that Google will tell you the last time it cached your page, assuming that it has been cached. To see what Google has read on the page, click the link that says “Cached Text” and you can see what words on your site that Google has found. As always, it may take a few days for Google to apply cached text to its index, so your result in the Google index may show an older title or description.
  • Related: The related command is important because it can tell you which sites Google thinks are related to your own. In some cases, you may find that your site is listed among sites that are not relevant to yours in any way. This can happen if you’ve gotten links from questionable sources. This condition is known to some as bad co-citation, which means that you are associated with low quality sites by means of their links to you. Ideally, you want your list of related sites to contain your top competitors, or sites which are similar to your own. The solution? Get quality links from relevant sites, become a better a topic leader in your field, and make sure the content on your site is more relevant. You can even link out to your competitors in a way that does not directly pass high-value anchor text for a term you want to be found on.
  • Linkdomain: This command only works in Yahoo, and shows how many links that a site has. Google (through the link: command) only shows a few links, so Yahoo has a clear advantage on this front. A command like this is very useful if you want to see how many links your competitors are getting, and you can download the first 1000 links to a spreadsheet. You can also use the link: command in Yahoo, but it only shows links to a specific page. If you exclude the domain itself (by way of the format “linkdomain:example.com -example.com) then you can see links pointing at the site, but not on the site itself. There are also dropdowns in Yahoo Site Explorer that will do this for you.

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